Leave a gift to Bliss in your will

A boy holding his premature twin siblings in a hospital

A will is important as it’s a way to secure support for the people and causes you really care about after you've died. Many people are put off making one because they think it will be difficult or expensive, but it doesn’t have to be.

One in every seven babies in the UK is born premature or sick and in need of specialist hospital care.

Whether a baby spends a few days, weeks or many months in hospital, or sadly don’t survive to come home, the journey they face is difficult and full of challenges.

For more than 40 years Bliss has been there for these babies, and by including a gift to us in your Will, you can be there for babies born in years to come.

Gifts in wills come in all shapes and sizes. Just 1 per cent of your estate could help us to give future generations of the UK’s most vulnerable babies the best possible start in life

Leaving a gift in your will guide

In this guide, you will find information about Bliss' vital work as well as more about the will writing process and answers to supporters’ frequently asked questions.

If you’d like the convenience of having your Will written in the comfort of your own home, you may wish to contact our partners, The Goodwill Partnership.

The Goodwill Partnership offers affordable home visits conducted by trained counsellors who come to your home and help you write your Will at a time that’s convenient for you. Your Will is then checked by one of The Goodwill Partnership’s approved solicitors and returned to you.

Please call 0844 669 6148 and quote 'Bliss' to find out more, or arrange an appointment.

Alternatively, you may wish to speak to your family solicitor. You can find a recommended solicitor in your area using one of the following websites: The Law Society (England and Wales), The Law Society of Scotland or The Law Society of Northern Ireland.

Gifts in Wills help Bliss achieve its ambition that every single baby born needing neonatal care benefits from our work.

Caroline Lee-Davey, chief executive