Helpline 0808 801 0322

 

Multiple babies


It is quite common for one baby to be ready to go home from the hospital before the other/s. This can be a confusing time for parents of multiples as it can be traumatic to leave a baby behind. It is crucial for you to continue bonding with the babies or baby that remains in hospital; this is best achieved by skin-to-skin contact when you are visiting. You may like to leave a photo near the baby’s cot, and also take one home for the remaining family members.

It can sometimes feel like favouritism to be spending time with the baby at home, but it’s important to remember that you will soon be able to have your babies together again. Treating twins and multiples as individuals is good for their long term development.

Sleep time and safe sleeping

Many multiples share a cot initially and research suggests that these babies tend to develop similar sleeping patterns, not waking any more often than babies who sleep apart. This research also suggests that cot-sharing twins have not been linked to an increased risk of cot death or SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).

Babies should sleep on their backs, with their feet to a firm base to stop them wriggling under covers, covered with separate blankets. Most newborn twins/triplets/multiples start off by sleeping side by side at the foot of the cot. As the babies get larger they may stay in this position or sleep head to head. These both comply with the ‘feet to the foot of the cot’ recommendation aimed at reducing sudden infant death syndrome.

For more information on safe sleeping, including a video, see the information provided by the Lullaby Trust



Comments
Comments

Help us by sharing this post
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • Tweet this
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • Google
  • LinkedIn