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Statistics for babies admitted to neonatal units at full term


How many babies are admitted to neonatal care at full term?

Around 60 per cent of babies admitted to neonatal care are born at full term, i.e. at 37 weeks’ gestation or above. This equates to around 60,000 babies a year across the UK.

Why are babies admitted to neonatal care at full term?

There are a variety of reasons why full term babies need to be cared for on a neonatal unit.

According to an NHS England programme, which looked at reducing the number of term admissions on to a neonatal unit, the five most common reasons were:

  • Respiratory conditions (about 25 per cent of all admissions)
  • Infection (about 18 per cent of all admissions)
  • Hypoglycaemia - this is where a baby has low levels of glucose in their blood (almost 12 per cent of all admissions)
  • Jaundice (around 6 per cent of all admissions)
    • 81 per cent of these babies received phototherapy
    • 33 per cent received intravenous fluids
    • 1.6 per cent received a blood transfusion.
  • Asphyxia (HIE) (3 per cent of all admissions)

Read more about the Bliss-supported NHS England programme to reduce avoidable term baby admissions onto neonatal units.



References

Next: Neonatal mortality in the UK - how many babies die in their first 28 days of life?

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